12 species to confirm in every block

The recent discovery of nesting sedge wrens at the Connecticut Audubon Society’s center in Pomfret, is perhaps the most exciting find of the atlas so far.  But, although we hope to gain a better understanding of where rare species occur in the state, we also want to use the project to better understand the status of common species.  With this in mind, here are a dozen species that it should be possible to confirm in nearly every block. Continue reading “12 species to confirm in every block”

Block boundary problems – part 1

Earlier this week, I spent quite a bit of time at Hammonasset State Park.  Because I had some time to kill, I went to Hammonasset Point – the area just south of Rock Pond, at the start of the Moraine Trail, which sits in a separate atlas block from the rest of park.  My goal was to see what I could find that was nesting right in the tiny piece of land that is in block 120B. Continue reading “Block boundary problems – part 1”

Download the Summer Bird Count circle map

Last week, I wrote about the ways in which people conducting Summer Bird Counts this month can also contribute data to the atlas project.  To provide additional help to determine how blocks relate to count circles, we have produced a downloadable Google Earth (.kml) file, which shows the SBC circles.  If you have Google Earth on your phone and have already downloaded the data layer showing the block boundaries, you can add this layer to see how they overlap. Continue reading “Download the Summer Bird Count circle map”

Summer Bird Counts and the atlas project

Connecticut birding has a long history of citizen science, of which the Connecticut Bird Atlas is only the most recent incarnation. Summer Bird Counts (SBCs) – the mid-year equivalent of Christmas Bird Counts – have been run in the state for nearly three decades and aim to count birds within several 15-mile diameter circles scattered across the state to help track population changes. Continue reading “Summer Bird Counts and the atlas project”

Cuckoos carrying food

As we’ve noted before, the CF (carrying food for young) breeding code is problematic for species that regularly carry food for their own consumption. This code is designed specifically for cases where birds are presumed to be carrying food to their dependent young and it can be hard to determine whether that is the case sometimes. Many species can be seen with food in their beaks temporarily. But if they are going to eat it, they usually do so right away. Careful observation for a minute or two will usually ensure that the code is not misused. Continue reading “Cuckoos carrying food”

2,174 and counting …

As of this afternoon, 2,174 eBird checklists have been shared with the ctbirdatlas account.  Within those checklists, we have received almost 10,000 individual records with breeding codes attached, representing 152 potential breeding species.  Given that the breeding season is still getting going for many species, this level of effort bodes well for the project’s success and we are very grateful to everyone who has shared their checklists. Continue reading “2,174 and counting …”